Revisiting Snickers Pie

Well, around this time last year (actually, to the day, I’ve just noticed) I posted a recipe for Snickers Pie that I made for a ‘special friend’…blahblahblah.  You guessed it.  The special friend was M, and, having only just started dating, we were caught in a strange trap of how much to share, with whom, and when.  Anyways, clearly that’s worked out pretty well: here we are a year later and I’m bringing you another Snickers Pie with tips, tricks, and a warning label (and minimally better photos).

I made this year’s pie almost exactly like last year’s.  I did substitute ground up Annie’s Snickerdoodle Bunny Cookies for the graham crackers (I’ve tried the new Snickerdoodle and Gingersnap flavors, both are wonderful!).  Because the cookies themselves were flavored, I excluded the brown sugar and the cinnamon in my graham cracker crust, and dropped the melted butter down to 3-4 Tablespoons to accommodate for that.  This crust was awesome!  It shined through, even against the chocolate, caramel, and peanuts.  Annie’s cookies will be my new go-to for cookie-crumb crusts.

I also very nearly burnt the caramel sauce (it cooked up to about 5-10 degrees hotter than the recipe recommended).  After I tasted a smidge of cooled caramel, I was worried.  It had the distinctive burnt, bitter edge.  I didn’t have time to make more caramel and was rather upset, but M insisted that paired with the chocolate and run through with peanuts, it would be fine.  He was right.  The nearly-burnt caramel helped to cut through the sweetness of this pie.  I wouldn’t recommend purposefully trying to reach this point of near-burning caramel, unless you have a lot of experience with the substance.  Non-burnt caramel is equally delicious, and a better participant in this sugar-riot of a recipe.

Now for the warning:  now that I have perfected my original recipe, I hereby give this warning: This pie is extremely rich and very sweet.  This is a tiny-sliver for a serving type of dessert, with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream on the side to help cut through the sugar.  I sliced far too big of slices the first round, and though we gamely and happily ate all of our servings, M and I fought off sugar comas all the way through Skyfall.

I still love the idea of this pie…if it can actually be called that.  Pie is the best term I can think of, as it is filling in a pie shell.  I make it in a spring-form pan, so, uncut, it looks like a chocolate-topped cheesecake.  In all reality, it is a giant candy bar.  But, if Pecan Pie is consider pie, I think this should be as well.

Snicker-themed desserts are a likely theme for M’s birthday, at least until he requests  something different.  But I think that next year, I will have to cut this pie with another layer.  I was considering adding a layer of nougat (minus the almonds) like an actual snickers bar, but I think it still might be near too much sugar.  We’ve found that dairy cuts through the sugar very well, right now, I think my best bet would be to put a layer of cheesecake (or chocolate cheesecake) under the caramel-peanut layer (and probably make a half-batch of that recipe).  It would help to vary the flavors, and the tang of cheesecake is very welcome here.

Even so, this decadent pie is still our to enjoy.  We’re careful to eat only thin slices, if only to keep ourselves alert and functioning for the hour after eating. I’m wondering if we’ll finish it by Thanksgiving, and the influx of desserts that come with that holiday.  But for now, if you feel the need for a dangerously decadent dessert, follow the link below to my earlier post with the full recipe.  The only tweaks I made were mentioned above, and either crust pairs wonderfully with the candy filling!

SNICKERS PIE RECIPE (link to my earlier post)

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One Comment on “Revisiting Snickers Pie”

  1. […] making Snickers Pie for M’s birthday for the last two years, I vowed to switch things up from that delicious sugar coma.  Shortly after last […]


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